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Anna Maria Jönsson

Professor

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Temperature and Tree Size Explain the Mean Time to Fall of Dead Standing Trees across Large Scales

Författare

  • Antje Gärtner
  • Anna Maria Jönsson
  • Daniel B. Metcalfe
  • Thomas A.M. Pugh
  • Torbern Tagesson
  • Anders Ahlström

Summary, in English

Abstract
Dead standing trees (DSTs) generally decompose slower than wood in contact with the forest floor. In many regions, DSTs are being created at an increasing rate due to accelerating tree mortality caused by climate change. Therefore, factors determining DST fall are crucial for predicting dead wood turnover time but remain poorly constrained. Here, we conduct a re-analysis of published DST fall data to provide standardized information on the mean time to fall (MTF) of DSTs across biomes. We used multiple linear regression to test covariates considered important for DST fall, while controlling for mortality and management effects. DSTs of species killed by fire, insects and other causes stood on average for 48, 13 and 19 years, but MTF calculations were sensitive to how tree size was accounted for. Species’ MTFs differed significantly between DSTs killed by fire and other causes, between coniferous and broadleaved plant functional types (PFTs) and between managed and unmanaged sites, but management did not explain MTFs when we distinguished by mortality cause. Mean annual temperature (MAT) negatively affected MTFs, whereas larger tree size or being coniferous caused DSTs to stand longer. The most important explanatory variables were MAT and tree size, with minor contributions of management and plant functional type depending on mortality cause. Our results provide a basis to improve the representation of dead wood decomposition in carbon cycle assessments.

Avdelning/ar

  • Institutionen för naturgeografi och ekosystemvetenskap
  • BECC: Biodiversity and Ecosystem services in a Changing Climate
  • LU profilområde: Naturbaserade framtidslösningar
  • MERGE: ModElling the Regional and Global Earth system

Publiceringsår

2023-05-15

Språk

Engelska

Publikation/Tidskrift/Serie

Forests

Volym

14

Issue

5

Dokumenttyp

Artikel i tidskrift

Förlag

MDPI AG

Ämne

  • Environmental Sciences
  • Forest Science

Nyckelord

  • standing dead wood
  • snag fall
  • woody decomposition
  • literature review;
  • re-analysis

Aktiv

Published

ISBN/ISSN/Övrigt

  • ISSN: 1999-4907